Oklahoma Cattle

at OKcattle.com

Summary of Oklahoma Brand Laws Those applying for State Brand Registration must fill out the "Application for Registration of Brands and Marks," and file the same with the Oklahoma Cattlemen's Association, Brand Division, Box 82395, Oklahoma City, OK 73148. The application must be accompanied by the $20.00 registration fee. Upon approval, a brand certificate will be mailed to the applicant indicating the brand registered. All brands approved by the Oklahoma Cattlemen's Association will appear in the next brand book or supplement printed. The current registration period ends December 31, 2014. State registered brand owners will be notified by mail prior to the closing of the five-year registration period, at which time their brands are to be renewed preparatory to publication of the 2010 Oklahoma Brand Book. Points to be kept in mind for State Brand Registration 1. A brand is defined as a permanent mark, not less than three inches in length or diameter and burned in with a hot iron, or a method commonly known as "freeze branding." Acid brands are not recognized for state registration. 2. Single unit brands such as: one initial, numeral, bar, slash or quarter circle, cannot be accepted for state registration. 3. Each brand registration must be confined to one location on the animal. Where the same brand is used on two positions, two applications are required. Brands must be registered for the following eight positions ONLY: Left Neck, Left Shoulder, Left Rib, Left Hip, Right Neck, Right Shoulder, Right Rib and Right Hip, except that previously registered Oklahoma brand positions are not affected in any way (O.S. 2, Sections 405). The left jaw is reserved for the use of Band T brands, identifying Brucellosis and Tuberculosis-reacting cattle. 4. Applicants are required, under law, to list three-distinct brands and/or three positions on the animal for use of their brand, in order preferred. 5. State registration of your brand is not required by law. Brands on record take precedence over unrecorded brands of like and kind where questions of ownership arise, placing the burden on proof on unregistered brand users in the event of controversy. Registered brands are prima facie evidence of ownership in a court of law. Brand books are furnished to County Sheriffs, County Extension Agents and Agricultural Education Instructors without charge. They may be purchased by the public at a price commensurate with the cost of preparation, printing and delivery thereof. For more information about State Brand registration, contact Tiffani Pruitt, 405.235.4391 or tpruitt@okcattlemen.org.   ...more

 

  USDA Market Reports

Oklahoma City Cow and Bulls (Tue)

Woodward Cow and Bulls (Wed)

Oklahoma City Weekly Cattle Narrative (Wed)

El Reno Cattle Narrative (Thu)

Oklahoma Direct Feeder Cattle (Tue)

Oklahoma Direct Feeder Cattle (Fri)

Oklahoma City Hogs (Mon-Tue-Wed)

El Reno Sheep (Thu)

Oklahoma City Wtd Avg Cattle (Mon & Tue)

El Reno Wtd Avg Cattle (Thu)

McAlester Wtd Avg Cattle (Wed & Thu)

Woodward Wtd Avg Cattle (Mon)

Apache Wtd Avg Cattle (Mon)

Texhoma Wtd Avg Cattle (Thu)

Ada Wtd Avg Cattle (Thu & Fri)

Tulsa Wtd Avg Cattle (Tue)

State Of Oklahoma Wtd Avg Cattle Summary (Fri)

Oklahoma City Wtd Avg Cattle Summary (Wed)

Estimated Market Receipts

Oklahoma City Actuals

National Slaughter Cattle Summary (Fri)


cattletoday.xml

SVF CATTLE COUNTRY COMMERCIAL REPLACEMENT SALE HELD AUG. 31ST
One thousand, one hundred and eleven commercial females from Florida's leading ranchers found ready acceptance at the recent Cattle Country Sale in Brighton, Fla.
IT'S THE PITTS -- A MOTHER'S PLEA
I'm not in the mood today to try and be funny. And normally I don't believe writers should use their podium to preach to people. In most cases I don't have the qualifications or the credentials.
HUNTIN' DAYLIGHT -- DEMAND-AGGRESSIVE MARKETING BUOY CATTLE PRICES
Cattle numbers continue to grow with national cowherd expansion, and various data suggest herd expansion is continuing this year.
CHUTE-SIDE VACCINE COOLER IS A USEFUL TOOL
A few simple steps can help cattle producers become more effective in battling respiratory disease in their herd, get full value of any vaccine they purchase, and possibly increase their operational profit in the process.
PRODUCERS BENEFIT FROM YEAR-ROUND HERD HEALTH PROGRAM
Many times a producer does not consider or appreciate the value of a good year-round herd health program until confronted with a difficult calving season or an unacceptable level of calf loss from health challenges.
GET CALVES STARTED ON THE RIGHT FOOT AT WEANING
During this time of the year, some producers may consider preconditioning beef calves prior to sale. This involves a multi-step process including weaning, a defined health protocol, nutrition, and marketing plan. The following article describes a few helpful tips for weaning and getting calves started on the right foot:
EARLY WEANING BENEFITS FIRST-CALF COWS
Summer heat can be hard on pastures, cows and calves, especially first-calf cows. These cows are in a special class as they are still trying to maintain body condition, actively grow, support reproduction by gestating with her second calf, and lactating.
PRODUCT HANDLING IS CRITICAL TO HERD HEALTH SUCCESS
The cow-calf production unit is the basis for the entire beef industry. The production of quality calves requires strict attention to the health of all calves, cows and bulls in the facility.
HYDRAULIC CALF TABLES MAKE LIVESTOCK HANDLING EASIER
Chutes and calf tables have made livestock handling easier—on the animals, and for the people doing the job, whether branding, castrating, dehorning, implanting calves, etc.
IT'S THE PITTS -- RATTLED
Despite having lived in, or near, rattlesnake country my entire life I've never known anyone who actually got bit by one, let alone got bit and lived to tell the tale. Until now, that is.
DO YOUR HOMEWORK BEFORE BUYING BULLS
As the bull-buying season gets underway, commercial cattlemen should do their homework to help ensure the bull(s) they purchase this year meet their needs.
PREWEANING CALF MANAGEMENT PRACTICES ADD VALUE TO FEEDERS
The concept of a value added calf (VAC) program is not new today, but in the late 1980's it was thought to have little value in some circles.
THE WORLD ACCORDING TO HOOTER MCCORMICK -- NO WORSTER
LeRoy was ancient. The lines in his face looked deep enough to hide in. His hair, mostly silver now, was still thick; his black eyes continued to sparkle with mischief.
DO HOMEWORK BEFORE HEADING INTO BULL BUYING SEASON
When it comes to genetics, bull selection is the most important decision the cow-calf producer has to make.
BLACK INK -- WEIGHING PREVENTION
Sometimes it only takes a couple of 2-cc subcutaneous shots to head off problems down the line. Sometimes it takes a few tons of steel, careful planning and focused construction.

 

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CattleToday.com
CattleToday's Q & A Boards are a Cattle Forum for swapping information and asking and answering questions about breed, health problems, beginners questions and jokes about cattle and horses.

What are you driving today?
by ohiosteve (Posted Mon, 16 Oct 2017 18:50:59 GMT+5)
Actually the visibility from the cab was better than a lot of the newer big dozers I've run.




John Deere Batteries in a Dodge/Cummins Pick-Up
by chevytaHOE5674 (Posted Mon, 16 Oct 2017 18:40:45 GMT+5)
Few years ago a heavy equipment mechanic buddy of mine said that Cat batteries were the only ones that used virgin lead anymore and those batteries lasted forever. They have since went to recycled lead like all the others and now they are no better than any other.

Now I go with batteries from the local Napa and replace them every couple years in the pickup. Replacing them before they fail is much easier than when your on the side of the road someplace at -30*F with snow and wind howling.



Working Longer
by TCRanch (Posted Mon, 16 Oct 2017 18:35:18 GMT+5)
greybeard wrote: have every intention of continuing until I'm physically unable or senile

If senility was a reason to get out of da cow bizness, some folks here are way overdue...
Good point! Actually, a number of friends & family members already think I'm certifiable. Things that make you go hmmmm?



Stocker Steve
by snoopdog (Posted Mon, 16 Oct 2017 18:27:15 GMT+5)
Happy Birthday !



Pics or it didn't happen
by Rafter S (Posted Mon, 16 Oct 2017 18:22:50 GMT+5)
Since you specifically said "I want to know if you folks would keep any of these heifers in your respective operations," the Hereford heifer is the only one I'd keep, but that's just because I only keep Hereford and Brangus. However, if I was keeping cross-bred heifers I'd probably keep all of them except the black mottle-faced one. I agree with cattleman99 about her looking a little light in the back.



Winter Calving Tips
by TCRanch (Posted Mon, 16 Oct 2017 18:22:19 GMT+5)
Agree with Jan, you're on it! If you put out good bedding/straw the mama will generally cocoon her calf in it to keep it warm and either protect it by blocking all elements and providing additional heat by laying with her back to it or even under her neck/chin. I calve out 1st calf heifers in the barn and quite often they'll automatically come back to seek the shelter with subsequent calves. Good luck!



Protein Tubs
by Rafter S (Posted Mon, 16 Oct 2017 18:18:21 GMT+5)
If that hurt them mine would have been dead years ago.



I have a calf that limpes on it's back lag it is swollen at the keen hoke and...
by wbvs58 (Posted Mon, 16 Oct 2017 18:18:16 GMT+5)
That sounds like bone moving, the hock is a fairly stable joint, I would be looking further up the leg for the problem. A dislocated hip can do that as the ball moves over the pelvis and gets caught and then releases as it pops over the bone as the limb is moved.

Ken



School me on the .223
by snoopdog (Posted Mon, 16 Oct 2017 18:15:03 GMT+5)
Iam borrowing an ar from a friend , familiar with the rifle, not the ammo. I will have to zero it. With a 1x8 twist, what weight bullet do i need for Accuracy ? I will be using it for coyotes . I doubt if I will take over a 300 yd shot , so is a dead on 100 yd sight in what I need ? I will be using factory loads, any recommendation?



Grazing stalks sprouted corn
by callmefence (Posted Mon, 16 Oct 2017 18:13:54 GMT+5)
I would think it would definitely be possible with a light frost. I would pull em for 2 weeks after. A good hard killing frost should be ok.
You could go ahead and kill it with round up.



Calving in late summer
by TCRanch (Posted Mon, 16 Oct 2017 18:07:01 GMT+5)
Lucky_P wrote:"Fall" calving season here is slated to begin Aug 1... but we invariably have some that come as much as 2 weeks early... and it's invariably doggone hot, which can pose some problems, when mama puts that black baby down out in the open and goes to the shade, leaving the little feller to heatstroke out there in the sun.
But... by calving in early Aug... cows are 3 months or more into lactation before we pull them in off pasture and start feeding - so, they're past their peak nutritional drain before they hit any limited nutrition issues that may be posed by our limit-feeding system - and... the calves learn to eat the ration they'll be expected to consume at weaning time next spring.
I have actually parked the Polaris next to a calf left out in the sun and secured golf umbrellas in the utility holes, moving/repositioning as necessary and occasionally giving the calf electrolytes. All while I reconsider why I even kept the cow (or in most cases 1st calf heifer) in the first place.



Extremely Profitable Big Time Operators ?
by Stocker Steve (Posted Mon, 16 Oct 2017 17:51:50 GMT+5)
I live in central MN now but I still hunt ND. Hard chargers with livestock here rent about half of their acres. Most folks are clueless grazers and set stock - - but I think this approach can work very well if you are able to do MIG, and manage variable stocking rates, and manage the cattle price cycle.

Might have to get up early to do all that...



Insurance
by Cross-7 (Posted Mon, 16 Oct 2017 17:30:28 GMT+5)
I wanted to add her employer is a retired army colonel and has done all he could. They paid her insurance for over 6 months while she wasn't working and gave her a job that suited her when she was able.
I've never met him but I but I hope to.



bad leg?
by Son of Butch (Posted Mon, 16 Oct 2017 17:13:08 GMT+5)
Bub wrote:the other day i noticed i had a heifer (500 lb range) thats was just laying around on her side. went out made her get up she was favoring one of he front legs pretty good i watched her for some time she could walk an try to put weight on it but moved off with a limp i shrugged it of as maybe twisted joint or something. went checked on her today now her front leg looks good but her hind leg on the same side is swelled up what looks from the hip all the way down to the hock i was able to get my hand on her it fills as if she has fluid right under her skin i gave her a shot of al 200 do y'all have any ideals or suggestions on whats going on thanks
Sounds like an injury to me.
Can happen anytime an animal gets it's front leg accidentally caught in something and struggles violently to get free.
Rear leg could be bruising or deep soft tissue damage, sometimes nerve damage occurs or even a fracture.

If possible isolate animal in a well bedded pen and give anti-inflammatory drugs. ie aspirin and/or banamine
Depending on severity most recover within 2-3 weeks.
IF you don't see improvement within 2 weeks of giving banamine then usually permanent damage has been done.



Growing the herd...
by Workinonit Farm (Posted Mon, 16 Oct 2017 15:15:38 GMT+5)
Hey!! That's great news, congratulations!




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